Skip to main content

tv   [untitled]    August 28, 2013 5:00pm-5:31pm PDT

5:00 pm
[fire engine] >> sorry. again, i used to live in san francisco. but as you all know, the housing prices here are very high. so, i had to move out of san francisco due to the cost of living. now i am renting in san mateo. but again as i said before, this is where i belong. this is where i want to serve here because i'm a peace officer san francisco. and the city spent a lot of money for me, so, it's a pay back. and again, because i want to live in san francisco, i've been saving money to buy a house in san francisco. but again, as i said before, and as most of you know, the houses are very expensive here and then comes supervisor mark farrell and his excellent team, come up with a program to assist first responders with a down payment assistance program.
5:01 pm
that's what exactly what we need. many of us want to live in the city and provide our services to the city, but -- [background noise] >> we have been forced to live somewhere else. i feel like i take the paycheck from san francisco and spend somewhere else. and, again, i want this program. i want to take advantage of this program. and i want to live in san francisco. again, i want to thank mayor lee, supervisor mark farrell, sheriff's department, our sheriff ross mirkarimi, the union, the [speaker not understood] association, managers association msa, for everything, they come up with a plan to help first responders. and i believe that it's a god send gift program for us because we want to live in the city because we want to serve the city.
5:02 pm
this is where we belong. and again, as i said, i made my decision when former sheriff mike hennessy swore me as a peace officer. i decided this is where i belong. and, again, i want to thank [speaker not understood] san francisco and everybody for being here today. and again, it's a lot of work. ~ voters of san francisco and i hope that the mayor of housing department and also mark farrell, supervisor mark farrell has enough money to assist us all who want to live in san francisco. not just 10 people or five people or two people. i believe that everybody deserves a chance. those who want to live in san francisco, those who want to provide service for san francisco, because we believe that this is where we belong. and that being said, thank you all. thank you for coming out here. and thank you for letting me speak.
5:03 pm
thanks again. (applause) >> thanks, merci. and thanks again for everyone being here today. i am supremely proud to stand with our men and women in uniform that are our public safety officers here in san francisco, with mayor ed lee and his team to launch this program today, and look forward to making it a great success. so, mayor lee, olson, i will be here to answer questions if you like off to the side. but thank you all for being here. much appreciated. ...
5:04 pm
5:05 pm
5:06 pm
5:07 pm
5:08 pm
5:09 pm
5:10 pm
5:11 pm
5:12 pm
5:13 pm
5:14 pm
5:15 pm
5:16 pm
5:17 pm
5:18 pm
5:19 pm
5:20 pm
5:21 pm
5:22 pm
name is my name namely kelly good on the city of mississauga city and county of san francisco. >> [applause] >> thank you my fan club fan club there and about. but welcome to the city of san francisco and welcome to usf. today we are gathered here as beneficiaries of the civil rights movement. to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. i am proud to stand before you as the first african-american, first woman city administrator. >> [applause] >>thank you. i i am grateful to be inspired and mentored by many great civil rights leaders and my educational leaders which includes usf law school.
5:23 pm
>> [applause] >> and my family members who have mentored me and have paved the way for me along my career path. i could not have gotten there without them. my greatest inspirations are my parents william little and maria little, and i my greatest inspirations are my parents william little and maria little, and i want to talk about howthey were inspired by the march on washington and dr. king's speech which subsequently has passed on to me. my mother was among the 200,000 people who joined dr. martin they were inspired by the march on washington and dr. king's speech which subsequently has passed on to me. my mother was among the 200,000 people who joined dr. martin luther king on the march on washington 50 years ago and stood up for the rights for freedom.as a teenager growing up in washington as a teenager growing up in washington dc, she and her church did people demonstrations leading up to the march in washington where they would go in front of the white house. you have to remember, the time. this was the time they would go there and racial epithets were thrown at them and people would come up and spit on them and they had to practice turning the other cheek. a very very scary time.but both of my parents,
5:24 pm
made me fully aware of the importance of that speech and importance of education and but both of my parents, made me fully aware of the importance of that speech and importance of education and the future of black america. as the first woman's and african-american city administrator i bow to do the best job i can possibly do for the city as i've done from as the first woman's and african-american city administrator i bow to do the best job i can possibly do for the city as i've done from the outset of my career.i will continue i will continue to draw on the inspiration and guidance from my parents and the civil rights leader in my educational leaderin our history and culture and the relentless fight against in our history and culture and the relentless fight against prejudice and intolerance, and hate. there consummate energy intelligence and courage and their unshakable persistence consummate energy intelligence and courage and their unshakable persistence unflinching sacrifice and unwavering faith.we all know the we all know the fight is not over yet.i will keep fighting when i called the three jays, jobs, justice and jubilee in my capacity as a public service. i will continue to ensure equal opportunity for all to compete in the public competitive contracting process. we will continue to fight for local jobs for those who can need jobs. we will
5:25 pm
continue to fight for justice for people who will serve despite their ethnic background, religion, economic immigration status and their government and their policies and process. as for jubilee,it gives me such joy that we just recently celebrated this historical victory of the same-sex marriages in san francisco is the first county clerks office in this state to say open california to perform ceremonies for same-sex couples during our pride weekend. >> [applause] >> we can continue to celebrate these historical events diverse cultures inheritances that make san francisco unique. 50 years ago dr. king i have a dream speech inspired and changed many lives. we as beneficiaries, of his legacy and of the civil right movement can keep his dream alive if we do all we can and all are shared by keeping fighting for
5:26 pm
social justice and equality for our generation and the next generation. thank you and welcome. >> [applause] >> don't say it. i've known her for a long time but i will say for how long. only her and her father no. she's beautiful. she turned out just wonderful. great job, dad. thank you naomi. a couple acknowledgments. i want to several members of the city family were here this evening. we want to acknowledge them on the human rights commission, and that wave your hand. thank you. >> [applause] >> michael sweet the commission chair, human rights commission.
5:27 pm
thank you >> [applause] >> and this this lady sitting next to me years on the police commission and i was her vice president a couple times. she was the director of human rights commission, theresa sparks. >> [applause] >> dir. of the southeast community facility where is he? there he is. >> [applause] >> i think i don't know where rhonda is where is rhonda? ishii requested i will save him to the end. he's either first or last. i have got to say this lady right here san francisco robin swick is with us this evening. >> [applause] >> and when i say this name people stand wave and we all
5:28 pm
know who the former it's hard to say farmer, mayor willie brown. >> [applause] >> i have been around the university for a long time. too long. what has been too long but it's been a long time. i can of course number the events of the civil rights movement. i was actually on this campus the day dr. king died and we all cried. you know, in those days all was on university were trying to do our thing. if we wanted to do we could do the big things we did our little things. on this campus i was the first chair of the psu. in
5:29 pm
many ways oh well. >> [applause] >> we must have some dsu members. now you know who started this whole thing. in those days we were trying to do what we could to be part of the movement. the movement that was all the adults and then there was a whole bunch of youth were involved. last sunday on a radio show i had a use spoken word artists that came on. [inaudible] all these adults in the program it's a use for such a big part. you've seen those old videos. when dr. king finally said, look, we need young people out here to oppose move this thing forward. so representing all the youths were involved in movement at this time i want to bring forth a young spoken word artist from
5:30 pm
youths these, ms. monet boyd will be a piece representing young people. monday, come forth. >> [applause] >> hi. my name is mono monet boyd. i'm 16 years old. i go to el cerrito high school and a been writing poetry since i was like 11 years old. it was a way for me to write down how i felt. [inaudible] what things i saw around. i even well when i get involved with youth speaks, an organization to have youth speak. i put my pen and paper to life. i did spoken word and i was able to relate to others in my humble testimony. this piece i'm about to read for
left
right